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Ethical Symbols Explained

on March 23 | in Featured, Reaching the Customer | by | with No Comments

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Do you really know what these symbols stand for?

            Recently more than ever, businesses are producing new and renovating the old to enhance how they are viewed ethically. From food items to clothing pieces, companies are becoming eco-friendly and overall better. Many of you may have seen the common words “Organic” written in big bold letters or “No Preservative”. But the symbols many don’t know the meaning of is what we will be discussing today. The millennial generation is one of the first to care so heavily on what is being put in and on their bodies. On this blog post, ethical symbol’s will be placed in two different categories: Cruelty-Free and Fair Trade. After these ethical symbols are explained, there will be a clear understanding of their importance and differences.

Cruelty-Free

            A cruelty-free symbol is placed on multiple types of products but most commonly on how house products and clothing. It has also become an ongoing trend for cosmetic brands and stores to create sections that are fully devoted to cruelty-free only products. Three of the most common and seen are the Leaping Bunny, Caring Customer, and CCF Rabbit Logos.

The Leaping Bunny

The Leaping Bunny was created by CCIC & BUAV (cruelty-free international). Located on their website, it states that the Leaping Bunny Logo is the only internationally recognized symbol guaranteeing consumers that no new animal tests were used in the development of any products displaying it. Between this logo and PETA’s, it is one of the most seen in America and around the world.

The Caring Customer

The Caring Customer logo is also known as the Cruelty-Free logo and was created by PETA. PETA stands for People of the Ethical Treatment of Animals. This organization is known as the largest animal rights group in the world. Today it has more than 6.5 million members and supporters. On PETA’s website, they state that “Companies listed either signed PETA’s statement of assurance or provided a statement verifying that they do not conduct or commission any animal tests on ingredients, formulations, or finished products and that they pledge not to do so in the future”.

The Not Tested On Animals

The Not Tested On Animals logo also known as the CCF Rabbit was established by the Choose Cruelty-Free organization. They are also Australian based. On their websites, it states that their logo may only be used by accredited companies. These companies must take out a license and have paid the annual fee. To be verified in using this symbol on the label of your product means no ingredients have been either tested on animals by it, by anyone on their behalf and must not contain any ingredients derived specifically from killing an animal or provided as a by-product from killed animals. 

Fair Trade

            Fair-trade logos are used in a number of food items and produced goods such as coffee beans. The two most popular logos are the Fair Trade International and Fair Trade Certified. On fairtradewinds.net it states that “the fair trade landscape has grown rapidly over the past few years and with that, the number of products available has also grown. As you may have experienced, navigating the various fair trade labels, logos, and membership groups associated with the ever-increasing availability of fair trade products can be a bit difficult”.

Being labeled as fair trade involves a few aspects. Aspects of being fair trade certified involve: Identify Type of Producer, Determine Minimum Price & Fair Trade, Ensure Labor Laws are Followed, Set Costs of Inspection, Certification, & Licensing, Inspect Supply Chain, and Ensure End Products are Properly Labeled. Most of my research done on Fair Trade has been learned from fairtradewinds.net. Being Fair Trade results in being ethical, fair, truthful, and much more.

The Fair Trade International

The Fair Trade International logo signifies that a fair cost has been paid to small farmers and also a Fairtrade premium above the fair price, which goes towards social, environmental or economic development of the local community. The organization that has produced this logo believes that there can be sustainable development that benefits the world’s poorest if the trade is equitable and has transparency.

The Fair Trade Certified

The Fair Trade Certified label is also known as the Fair Trade Label. It can be seen on popular brands such as Patagonia, fresh produce, and even food items like BarkTHINS Dark Chocolate. Although there are many versions of this logo, it is one of the most seen today. Fair Trade USA is a non-profit organization that has granted fair trade status to over 800 manufacturers and distributors. In comparison to the Fair Trade International logo, Fair Trade US sees themselves not just as a market. They are a social movement that offers real choice to consumers and real change to farmers and workers.

Don’t forget to check out our Reaching the Customer section for more ethical tips, facts, and opinions!

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